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The greatest sports announcer in history appropriately honored on Opening Day at Dodger Stadium in 2014. Photo courtesy of dodgers.mlb.com

 

EXPRESSING MY DESIRE TO FULFILL A PROMINENT ITEM ON MY BUCKET LIST.

I understand that millions of baseball fans not only in Southern California, but in these entire United States, have the same wish as what the title of this article says.

After all, this is a man who – along with Tommy Lasorda – is the Dodgers’ last link to Brooklyn as he began calling games for that franchise in 1950.

Except for Jackie Robinson (who he covered for seven years!) breaking the color barrier in 1947, he was there for every meaningful Dodger moment, from their first World Series title in 1955,

To perhaps the most significant episode in baseball history; the Dodgers’ move to L.A. that devastated a borough in 1958,

 

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Vin Scully doing something that he has exquisitely done for the past 67 seasons – call Dodger games. Photo courtesy of vinscullyismyhomeboy.com

 

To the opening of a ballpark still considered one of the best in the majors in a hilly area north of downtown Los Angeles in 1962, which Lasorda has famously called “Blue Heaven on Earth”

To the pitching dominance of Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale that ultimately Christened Dodger Stadium in the 1960s,

To the eight-year tenure of Garvey, Lopes, Russell and Cey in the Dodger infield in the 1970’s,

To Fernandomania and the miracle provided by Kirk Gibson in the 1980s,

To the Superman-like antics of Mike Piazza in the 1990s,

To his continuing charm spinning tales from a press box named after him in this century.

Back in the late 90s and in 2000, MTV had a show called “Fanatic”, where regular folks got to meet and talk with their favorite celebrities.

 

One would expect to see Vin Scully’s 1988 World Series Gibson home run call or him calling Bill Buckner’s error in the 1986 World Series here, but I thought it would be cool to post a video of something a little different – Scully telling a story about the great Satchel Paige during a game at Dodger Stadium on May 12, 2015.

 

If that show were around today, I would use any means necessary to meet and talk to Vin Scully.

I know that millions of other Dodger fans would say the same thing, particularly since his time in the booth has about three months to go as after 67 years, he’s finally calling it a career.

Also like everyone else, the reason I want to meet Scully is not only due to this great man being passed down from generation to generation in a sense; my mother told me about how my grandparents would blast his voice on the radio every day during the summer, describing the action that the Dodgers provided,

But because – and I know this sounds hokey, clichéd, and a bit silly – even though I have never met him, Vin Scully has been a great friend.

As I have stated, I completely understand that this desire of mine is shared by, at the bare minimum, 150 million people.

But as time is starting to run out, I am planning to make a non New Year’s resolution and see what I can do to make this item on my bucket list come true, starting with writing the hashtag #IWANTTOMEETVINSCULLY on every post on this site’s Twitter page (Here’s the link: http://www.twitter.com/socalshfanatic) 

 

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The city of Los Angeles renaming the street leading to Dodger Stadium to Vin Scully Avenue earlier this year. Photo courtesy of scpr.org

 

As well as on SoCal Sports Annals’ Facebook page as much as I can (Here’s the link to that: http://www.facebook.com/SocalSportsHub)

In other words, my campaign to meet and spend a little time with the greatest broadcaster in the history of sports starts today.

Do I honestly expect this desire to be fulfilled?

I’d be lying if I said yes, but I’m going to take this attitude:

I at least have to try.

I’ll end this post with three more words:

WISH ME LUCK.

#IWANTTOMEETVINSCULLY

 

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Generated by IJG JPEG Library Vin Scully getting ready to throw out the first ball. Photo courtesy of gettyimages.com

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